DIGGING QUARTZ CRYSTAL IN ARKANSAS 2 of 6: General Description

digging_crystal_in_AR-2-6Gen-DescLast time we discussed crystal mining in Arkansas and how it varies from digging. Digging your own crystal is a rewarding and exhilarating experience; because I’ll describe digging in much more detail later, for now, I will speak in generalities.

Most of the mines require a small digging fee for the entire day. You simply choose a mine, pay the fee, sign a liability release and then start digging. Safety is a major concern for all ages. Children need close supervision and must be guided and watched diligently. There are a lot of drop offs and places for little (and big) people to get seriously hurt. However, if the safety considerations are carefully observed, I would recommend crystal digging to people of all ages. It is important to remember that common sense is the most important tool to use.

A “working mine” will offer the best digging. When choosing a mine, you’ll want to find out how often they “work” it. You‟ll want to know if they dig every day, or if they are digging the day you are going to be there. Which day will give you the best chance to find something? Crystal digging is a bit like fishing; a mine that gave you lots of crystal last time may give you very little the next time. It depends on many factors. It depends on what the mine owners have found in the pit (and subsequently brought up in the tailings). It also depends on the weather (rain is helpful to wash the dirt off crystals that may not otherwise be seen), and believe it or not, it also depends on your own mood. I have discovered that if I‟m not in the right place mentally, the Crystal People seem to go into hiding. When I am feeling good, and my vibrations are high, when I am in a grateful space, I tend to see them more easily. Don’t worry; we will talk more about the specifics of crystal digging later.

crystal digging in ArkansasBreakage happens quite a lot, as you might imagine. Crystal is hard, but blasting and earth-moving equipment takes its toll. The process creates a lot of loose rock and dirt that has to come out of the pit. The mine operators are digging for the “premium” crystal, intact large points and clusters, with the key word being intact. The rest comes up in the tailings for rescue by you and me. There is a LOT of “premium” crystal to be found in the tailings; there is also a lot of breakage. When I say “premium,” I am not making a value judgment that these crystals are “premium” because they are “better.” Nor am I saying that the crystals in the tailings aren’t as worthy or powerful. In fact, at times, the crystals in the tailings seem more precious to me, because the very act of retrieval is why they aren’t in one piece.

Mount Ida and Jessieville crystal mines aren’t the only place you can find crystal in Arkansas. On hiking trails, along the roadside, even in Lake Ouachita (Wash-i-taw), you might happen upon a crystal point or two. Certainly you will find quartz matrix (smashed-in-the-spaces, non-point kind of quartz crystal). Of course, finding rock crystal (points) in these places isn’t as likely because there is less of it being uncovered by weather and erosion.

digging quartz crystal in ArkansasConvenience and use play a part in the question of size. Is bigger better? Does a large point put out more energy than a small point? Certainly, by mass alone, a 500-pound single crystal point is going to exude more energy than a tiny jewelry point, but this is not to say that the smaller points don’t have comparable energy or enough energy to matter. Comparatively speaking, a small crystal might have the same energy as a large point. By example, an ant can move ten to fifty times its body weight. Using that gauge, you can see that ants are stronger than humans, ounce for ounce. A small point may be stronger than a large point in the same respect; some very small points are deceptively powerful, meaning that bigger in size doesn’t always mean better. Also, it is easy to put a small point around your neck or in your pocket. Wheeling a 500-pound crystal around in a wagon would get tiring after a while! Depending on the crystal, its use and your need, a small point can be every bit as helpful to you as its larger cousin. The old adage is true about not judging a book by its cover (or an item by its size).

In the next post we’ll move on to discover when is the best time to go crystal digging. Gathering is technically the process that I’m describing, but to say you are gathering crystals invokes a picture of skipping through a meadow and picking flowers. This is not an accurate picture. What follows in the upcoming posts will be a detailed description of how to go about collecting your own crystals; when to go, what to bring, how to find it and finally, what to do when you bring it home. See you next time!

About Genn

Genn John has been acting as the legs for the Crystal People as the Keeper at Arkansas Crystal Works, an internet-based source for crystals and crystal knowledge, since 1995. Having accepted the honor to be their voice as well, she is the author of Understanding The Crystal People: A Handbook for Lightworkers; a crystal reference book for people who desire to fully understand their connection to the crystal kingdom and who wish to enhance their working knowledge of these majestic beings. Genn has also published a 4 part series of coloring books which are a useful tool for anyone with an interest in learning the anatomical structures of quartz crystals. It features precise, extraordinary hand-drawn designs crafted especially for easy coloring and interactive study. Find the store and more at www.arkansascrystalworks.com, or her blog at www.crystalgenn.com. To connect: email - genn@arkansascrystalworks.com, facebook - https://www.facebook.com/ArkansasCrystalWorks, Instagram - gennjohn or Twitter @GennJohn.
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